To Read This Week: Accidential Christians, Tender College Students, and Unanswered Intellectual Questions

Screen Shot 2015-04-23 at 8.45.36 PM“The Limits of Accidental Christianity” by J. Warner Wallace at coldcasechristianity.com. – Jim Wallace explains that happening to believe in Christianity without knowing it true is not the way to go.  We need to be able to give evidence to the truth of Christianity.  It is commanded in 1 Peter 3:15.

“College Like Kindergarten? Students Need Cookies, Coloring Books, Bubbles, Play-Doh, Blankies and Frolicking Puppies” by Napp Nazworth at christianpost.com – being an educator myself, this is a disturbing trend that is occurring at college.  We don’t have a right to not be offended.  In my graduate studies at a local college I was offended weekly but I didn’t throw a fit over it.

“Young Christians Spiritually Failing in Real World Because Youth Groups Depend Too Much on Emotional High” by Nancy Pearcy at chrisitanpost.com – The main reason people abandon Christianity is unanswered intellectual questions.  In fact, according to sociologist Christian Smith when teenagers were asked, “Why did youScreen Shot 2015-04-23 at 8.49.53 PM fall away from the faith in which you were raised?”  The most common answer was intellectual skepticism. (p. 89, Soul Searching, Oxford Univ Press, 2009)

By J. Steve Lee

J. Steve Lee has taught Apologetics for over a decade at Prestonwood Christian Academy. He also has taught World Religions and Philosophy at Mountain View College in Dallas. With a degree in history and education from the UNT, Steve continued his formal studies at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary w/ an M.A. in philosophy of religion and has pursued doctoral studies at the UT-Dallas. He is finishing his dissertation at South African Theological Seminary. He has published several articles for the Apologetics Study Bible for Students (B&H Publishing, 2010) as well as articles & reviews in various periodicals including Philosophia Christi, Hope’s Reason: A Journal of Apologetics, and the Areopagus Journal.

%d bloggers like this: